Art inspired by Landscape

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Kurinuki stoneware pot

Kurinuki stoneware pot

Selection of Kurinuki pots

Selection of Kurinuki pots

Kurinuki pot with succulents

Kurinuki pot with succulents

Biography

I am an Arts Educator with 18 years experience of teaching in schools, FE colleges and University. I initially trained as an interior designer and worked in the field of architecture and conservation before retraining as a teacher. Alongside teaching, I have recently set up my own practice as a ceramic artist, making, selling and exhibiting my work. Having built a studio in my garden during the first 'Lockdown' I am now able to work from home and dedicate more time to my real passion for making ceramics. My interest grew from taking Ceramics A 'level at Mid-Warwickshire College in the eighties, I have dabbled ever since and have always been particularly interested in Japanese techniques and the teachings of Bernard Leach.

inspiration

During the first lockdown in March 2020, I was really stuck as to what I could make from home, without any access to specialist equipment. I had always been interested in Japanese ceramics and particularly Raku. I did some research and came across several contemporary ceramicists who have adapted traditional Kurinuki techniques to their own style, this prompted me to start experimenting and to develop this new body of work. My work is experimental, instinctive and spontaneous. I use coarse clays, porcelain slip and oxides to reflect the earth and the elements.

medium

I hand-build, original kurinuki stoneware pots in various styles, shapes and colours and often display them with succulent plants or cacti. Kuri Nuki is a traditional Japanese form of hand-building. The word means ‘carving out’ and it involves shaping and adding texture to a solid block of clay, then hollowing out to create 'interior space’, it is a more sculptural approach to making. The idea behind Kurinuki is that it should be spontaneous and ‘alive’, that the work should show the marks of the maker, that these marks should be deliberate and are of value in their own right. The finish is not supposed to be refined and smooth - the more raw and sculptural the better, to demonstrate the process of making.